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April 19, 2011

Comments

King Krak, I Drink The Wine

Perhaps it won't be long now til he has a US importer. :)
Thanks for this post!

vimpressionniste

Hey, would you happen to know at which estate the Japanese jura winemaker works? Thanks!

Mark Thomasseau

What a wonderful expression of passion for life! Great post! I agree with a previous post - someday a US importer.

Iris

Beautiful post once again, thank you Bert, I felt taken back over 20 years to the times, when we cut our woods on the steep hill-slope behind Lisson, to plant our wines - same procedure: rock and rocks after ripping out the tree-roots, a cable plough from Switzerland to clean the slopes and give the young plants the time to install their roots... erosion after heavy rains... later on we left the natural herbs cover, which stabilized the soil - cut only 2 times, to keep natural varieties...low or no spraying...a small imported Italian caterpillar to carry weights like water and the harvest boxes.. even the cellar work, with natural yeasts, pigeages and the old basket-press with its central screw and the soft click-clack noise seems to be the same... would like to visit some day - just a difference: people around didn't compare with Fitzcaraldo, but with Cayenne, when they looked at us working on the hill;-)...

WhiteWineExp

Thanks for sharing this inspirational post. A Japanese working as a winemaker in France...

Marga van Winsen

Impressive all this information for the writer and dedication from the winemaker. I'll check out if there is some allocation for the Netherlands available. MERCI!

Michel Audette

Great story. I found out about Mr Ooka from today's NY Times. As a French speaker with a Japanese wife, and having lived 5 years in Japan while doing research, I can say that while there are differences between France and Japan in relation to work, there are strong parallels as well. These parallels include a more traditional family life than found in North America as well as a strong emphasis on traditional food culture. Moreover there seems to be strong French tourist and temporary worker contingents in Japan, and conversely an attraction to places like Paris amongst Japanese tourists.

Mr Ooka's gamble resonates very strongly with me. I am a believer in taking calculated risks towards a career one can be passionate about, in a manner that views geographical obstacles as relatively minor, or even a "dépaysement" (foreign immersion) that should be embraced.

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